Same Day Crowns

A dental crown is a tooth-shaped cap that is placed over a tooth to cover the tooth to restore its shape, size, strength, and improve its appearance. Dental crowns are cemented in place, fully encasing the entire visible portion of the tooth that lies at and above the gum line.

Refresh your Smile in a Single Visit

Zirconia or milled crowns which are digitally constructed either in an office that has the software and hardware to produce them or in a dental lab. Dental offices that have the software and hardware have the ability to produce a crown in one visit with no need for a temporary one. These crowns require no impression.

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"I am more confident and happy with my smile! His work is impeccable and he genuinely cared. Over all the years of seeing dentists, he is by far the best. I’m looking forward to having more work done with him. I recommend Wayzata Dental 100%."
MJ Evans

Frequently Asked Questions

Why is a Dental Crown Needed?

  • To protect a weak tooth from breakage or to hold together parts of a cracked tooth
  • To restore an already broken tooth or a tooth that has been severely worn down
  • To cover or support a tooth with a large filling when there isn’t a lot of tooth structure left
  • To hold a dental bridge in place
  • To cover misshapen or severely discolored teeth
  • To cover a dental implant
  • To make a cosmetic modification

For children, a crown may be used on primary (baby) teeth in order to:

  • Save a tooth that has been so damaged by decay that it can’t support a filling
  • Protect the teeth of a child at high risk for tooth decay, especially when a child has difficulty keeping up with daily oral hygiene
  • Decrease the frequency of general anesthesia for children who, because of age, behavior, or medical history, are unable to fully cooperate with the requirements of proper dental care

In such cases, a pediatric dentist is likely to recommend a stainless steel crown.

What Types of Dental Crowns Are Available?

Permanent crowns can be made from stainless steel, all metal (such as gold or another alloy), porcelain-fused-to-metal, all resin, or all ceramic.

Stainless steel dental crowns are prefabricated crowns that are used on permanent teeth primarily as a temporary measure. The crown protects the tooth or filling while a permanent crown is made from another material. For children, a stainless steel crown is commonly used to fit over a primary tooth that’s been prepared to fit it. The crown covers the entire tooth and protects it from further decay. When the primary tooth comes out to make room for the permanent tooth, the crown comes out naturally with it. In general, stainless steel crowns are used for children’s teeth because they don’t require multiple dental visits to put in place and so are more cost-effective than custom-made crowns and prophylactic dental care needed to protect a tooth without a crown.

Metals used in crowns include gold alloy, other alloys (for example, palladium), or a base-metal alloy (for example, nickel or chromium). Compared with other crown types, less tooth structure needs to be removed with metal crowns and tooth wear to opposing teeth is kept to a minimum. Metal crowns withstand biting and chewing forces well and often last the longest in terms of wear down. Also, metal crowns rarely chip or break. The metallic color is the main drawback. Metal crowns are a good choice for out-of-sight molars.

Porcelain-fused-to-metal dental crowns can be color matched to your adjacent teeth (unlike the metallic crowns). However, more wearing to the opposing teeth occurs with this crown type compared with metal or resin crowns. The crown’s porcelain portion can also chip or break off. Next to all-ceramic crowns, porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns look most like normal teeth. However, sometimes the metal underlying the crown’s porcelain can show through as a dark line, especially at the gum line and even more so if your gums recede. These crowns can be a good choice for front or back teeth.

All-resin dental crowns are less expensive than other crown types. However, they wear down over time and are more prone to fractures than porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns.

All-ceramic or all-porcelain dental crowns provide better natural color match than any other crown type and may be more suitable for people with metal allergies. However, they are not as strong as porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns and they wear down opposing teeth a little more than metal or resin crowns. All-ceramic crowns are a good choice for front teeth.

Zirconia or milled crowns which are digitally constructed either in an office that has the software and hardware to produce them or in a dental lab. Dental offices that have the software and hardware have the ability to produce a crown in one visit with no need for a temporary one. These crowns require no impression.

Temporary versus permanent.

Temporary crowns can be made in your dentist’s office, whereas permanent crowns are made in a dental laboratory. Temporary crowns are made of acrylic or stainless steel and can be used as a temporary restoration until a permanent crown is constructed by a lab.

 

How should I care for my temporary dental crown?

  • Avoid sticky, chewy foods like chewing gum or caramel, which have the potential of grabbing and pulling off the crown
  • Avoid chewing hard foods and bread, which could dislodge or break the crown
  • Slide flossing material out (rather than lifting) when cleaning your teeth. Lifting the floss out, as you normally would, might pull off the temporary crown

How Long Does A Dental Crown Last?

On average, dental crowns last between 5 and 15 years. The life span of a crown depends on the pre-existing conditions of your tooth, the amount of wear and tear the crown is exposed to, how well you follow good oral hygiene practices, and your personal mouth-related habits, such as clenching and grinding, chewing ice, biting fingernails and using your teeth as tools to open things.

Does a Crowned Tooth Require Special Care?

While a crowned tooth does not require any special care, remember that because a tooth is crowned does not mean the tooth is protected from decay or gum disease. Therefore, continue to follow good oral hygiene practices, including brushing your teeth at least twice a day, flossing daily (especially around the crown area where the gum meets the tooth), and rinsing with an antibacterial mouthwash at least once a day.

How Much Does A Dental Crown Cost?

Costs of crowns vary depending on the type of crown selected (for example, porcelain crowns are typically more expensive than gold crowns, which are typically more expensive than porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns). Generally, crowns can range in cost from $600 to $1500 or more per crown. A portion of the cost of crowns is generally covered by insurance. To be certain, check with your dental insurance company.

 

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